A Midsummer Night’s Read

Charlotte autographs her THE ACCIDENTAL ADVENTURES OF INDIA McALLISTER for the girls.

My friends, I have had a long hibernation from blogging, but it is not because I haven’t been reading.  In fact it’s midsummer, which means I’m midway through teaching my summer reading groups, which means, of course, that I’ve got a slew of new books for your favorite 8-12’s.  I’m most excited to share The Accidental Adventures of India McAllister, by Charlotte Agell, for a whole bunch of reasons.  One of them is that when I contacted Charlotte to let her know who I was and told her I had thirteen girls reading her book, she said she’d love to meet them in person.  And she did!  (See photos.)  Meeting or no, let me tell you why I love this book:  it is so honest.  It is honest about life, it is honest about age ten, it is honest about the way adventures are usually accidental, not planned.

The character India McAllister is a plucky, adventure-seeking fourth grader growing up in a quiet Maine town.  Her family situation is anything but conventional.  She is adopted from China (not India), and wishes she knew more Chinese people– heck, any Chinese people.   Her mom is an artist who is loving but flakey, sometimes forgetting to make dinner, and proudly displaying a plaster cast of her breast in the living room.  India’s parents are divorced, and her father now lives with Richard.  Richard is just in the way, as far as India is concerned, and takes up too much of her father’s attention.  India’s best friend is a boy, and some kids at school think this is weird.

Okay, people, I know at least one alarm went off in your head in reading that description.  If not an alarm, then at least the popping up of your eyebrows.  If it weren’t for the masterful handling of the content– completely un-exploitive and utterly, well, honest– I could understand that.  But this book made the ALA Top Ten Rainbow List for 2011 as well as the Bank Street College of Education’s 2011 Best Children’s Books List for a reason, and my guess on that reason?  India McAllister deals with difficult realities facing children today without overdramatizing them.

Let’s talk about Richard.  To India, a fourth grader, it is not foremost in her mind that her dad lives with a man.  The thing that bugs her about Richard is the same thing that bugs lots of kids about their parents’ love interests.  This person is an intruder and potential rival.  A ten-year-old doesn’t think sexually, so the fact Richard is male is unimportant.  Jealousy is an all-inclusive emotion.  India wouldn’t be any more or less jealous if her father’s lover was female.  I’d wager any of India’s readers who are themselves children of divorce can relate to her feelings.  In this way, Charlotte Agell quietly promotes tolerance by getting at the universal root  emotion, rather than getting hung up on who is what gender.  Other readers may connect more immediately, having gay parents themselves.  Still more may just recognize a friend or classmate’s family in India’s situation.  Same-sex couples are no longer invisible, and I love that Charlotte lets fiction reflect this reality in a politically neutral way.  The children can make up their own minds.  Or, they may not even pick up on it!  I’m not sure my own daughter did, but that may be because she has known same-sex parents and just thinks this is one more kind of family.  A brave new world.

Shall I discuss the breast?  I cracked right up when I read this part of the story.  It comes when India is longing for a mom with a more traditional job, citing the breast on the living room shelf as a reason.  The why behind the breast? India’s mom is a breast cancer survivor, and she made the cast right before the surgery– as a sort of homage to loss and strength.  Honest.  Charlotte brings up something sad that kids hear about.  Three out of thirteen of my students shared stories of moms, grandmothers they’d never met, and aunts who’d had breast cancer.  Who else writes about this in middle grade fiction and manages not to have it be a major plot point?  It’s brilliant.

And, children adopted by parents of different ethnic backgrounds, Charlotte is thinking of you, too.  Giving you a voice without making your other-ness define you (or define the plot of this book).  When one student of Asian descent (not adopted) told Charlotte at our meeting she could relate to how India wished for more people who looked like her in her town, a little round of applause sounded in my heart.

Yet, somehow, The Accidental Adventures of India McAllister is not an issues book.  It is a delightful story of a girl searching for adventure and never quite finding it.  A failed UFO sighting attempt.  A trumped-up whodunnit mystery around a purse that was simply lost.  A mysterious stranger playing a saxophone who turned out to be…a stranger playing a saxophone.  And then the accidental adventure itself, where India gets lost in the woods.  This book is not tightly plotted, and to me that’s what made it the most honest of all.  Being ten doesn’t have rising action, a climax, and resolution.  It’s just a series of adventures, large and small.  I cannot wait to read more of India’s.  Book Two is on the way (release date TBA).  Meanwhile, India has a blog of her own.

Charlotte explains she includes sad things in her books so kids who experience them in real life don't feel so alone.

A reader comments on India's spying tree, where she hides to eavesdrop on a pesky classmate.

Charlotte shows us her drawing pen of choice, inspiring us with its simplicity.

Topics in the story prompt the readers to share their own experiences.


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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Lynda Mullaly Hunt
    Jul 22, 2011 @ 09:25:54

    Loved this! I loved the post and I loved the pictures! Looks like a wonderful day. Nad, CAmeron, M’dear…you are a great book reviewer! 😉

    Reply

  2. Cameron Kelly Rosenblum
    Jul 22, 2011 @ 16:03:43

    It was indeed a memorable day. We also really loved the book! Thanks for the kind words, M’lady. 🙂

    Reply

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